Is this Yorkshire eatery the world's first egg restaurant?

egg crates act as lamp shades in a quirky cafe

Yolk farm is full of fun and quirky touches - Credit: Nicky Rogerson

It started with an egg, or was it a chicken? It’s the age-old question that not even the ‘eggsperts’ can answer (sorry, couldn’t resist). When it comes to Yolk Farm, a very impassioned couple came along first, and the rest just followed

Turn off the A1 by Boroughbridge and you’ll happen upon the world’s first egg restaurant – the creation of Ben and Emma Mosey. Just like the chicken and the egg debate, you’re probably wondering how this came to be?

After meeting at university in Edinburgh, the pair decided to spend some time living in Australia and Indonesia. It was there that the inspiration for Yolk Farm came about.

Not only did they notice that the food was a lot fresher, but so was the approach towards it. Believing they could bring this to the UK, the pair moved back and spent some time on Ben’s family farm while looking for their own premises.

In 2016 they found the perfect place and the following year had acquired Minskip Farm Shop and a casual 6000 hens. Even though the farm shop had been in operation for over 40 years, the couple made it their own, more than tripling its turnover in the process.   

Coming from a farming background, Ben noticed that ‘people’s attitude towards food was changing’ and realised there was an opportunity. Keen to bridge the gap in knowledge when it came to farming and food, the couple thought the best way would be to open a place that would create a conversation.

Enter Yolk Kitchen. Housed in one of the old hen sheds, the space is warm and inviting. From the swing seats to the rustic crate lampshades and egg-themed facilities, it certainly draws you in with its quirkiness and authenticity. Not to mention the undeniably delicious menu, all focused around, well you guessed it  . . eggs! 

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Refusing to play it safe and ‘inspired by the chilled out, brunch culture in Australia’, explains Emma, the couple thought. ‘if we were eggs and brunch then we would stick in people’s minds’  - they were spot on.  

Minskip Farm Shop and Yolk Kitchen are run as two separate businesses, each with their own demographic and brand, tied together by the farm and their hens. Realising that they sold around 1,000 eggs per day in the shop, and used between 100-200 a day in the restaurant, the couple decided to reduce their flock to 1,500, in turn reducing any unnecessary waste. 

Every morning the girls are let out of the ‘hen spa’ and into their six hectares of open, grassy land, where visitors are able to see them going about their daily affairs under the shade of the fruit trees and watchful gaze of their alpaca guardians. Combining this wholesome experience with eye-catching facts dotted around the farm and restaurant, visitors learn about eggs in a fun, but informative way, just as the couple intended.  

However, it’s more than just eggs that bind the two together. Whether you come for the fresh, local produce set out in a dazzlingly bright display as you enter the farm shop or the famous chicken pancakes in the restaurant, you’ll be charmed by the values and ethos of the place. Community plays a big part here, be it the partnerships they have going with local farmers and producers (over 90% of produce comes within 30 miles) or the relationships they nurture with their staff. It’s clear to see that their desire of ‘creating a place where people love coming to work’ has been achieved, as the farm now boasts a team of 40 ‘with each leader being given a professional coach’ to help them develop, explains Emma.  

Just as the values written on the walls in a quirky egg shape don’t go to waste, neither does much else here. Freshness is key, so anything nearing its sell-by date on the shelves will be quickly used in the restaurant or frozen for later use.

‘We sell the top 10pc of produce’ explains Ben, so anything not of the highest quality is made up into bags of pig feed for sale in the shop which has quickly become their bestselling item. ‘Two tonnes that would have gone into landfills each year now gives people such a joyful experience’ as Ben tells us how visitors love to feed the farm’s beloved Kune Kune pigs, affectionately referred to as their ‘waste warriors.’ While scraps from the restaurant are shared amongst the other animals.  

What was once a humble farm shop is now a fully immersive farming experience, somewhere special you’re eager to take your out-of-town friends. Like a perfect pancake recipe – the couple mixed their different knowledge and experiences to create something wonderful. The result is a place where people can experience the freshest of locally grown produce, tuck into tasty yet innovative dishes and enjoy a wholesome experience on a fun and informative farm with their loved ones. Life’s simple pleasures at their finest. 

yolkfarm.co.uk

minskipfarmshop.com

What to do at Yolk Farm

Alpaca Experience   

Book an experience like no other and spend some time getting to know these gentle creatures. Learn how to greet them, feel their soft fur, hear their hum and even rub noses with them if you’re lucky. Priced at £40 per person, visit yolkfarm.co.uk/alpaca-experience to book 

Feed the pigs  

Pop over to Minskip Farm Shop and pick up a bag of pig feed to give to the giant Kune Kune pigs. As they gobble it up take note of the fun facts dotted around their pen. We can guarantee you’ll learn some invaluable piggy trivia.  

Book an event   

Making use of their great space, Yolk Kitchen regularly host events in keeping with the mindful ethos of the farm. Expect everything from life drawing to watercolour classes and wellness workshops. Visit yolkfarm.co.uk/news to book 

Golden Yolk Dining Club 

Held regularly on special evenings at Yolk Kitchen, this series of unique dining experiences is sure to get the tastebuds tingling. Hosted by exciting guest chefs, tuck into seasonal dishes showcasing their expertise.  

Free-Range Fun  

Whether your little explorers are keen to learn nature crafts at Busy Birds or just want to experience the fun of farm life, there’s lots to get stuck into. Explore the vegetable garden, climb the hay bale and pop over to say hello to the hens and pygmy goats.  

Rehome a hen

Once the hens stop laying, two rehoming charities come along to the farm and collect them to send off to loving new homes. You can enquire about rehoming a hen at hello@yolkfarm.co.uk



hens in a green field

Watch the hens roam around their six hectares of open, grassy land - Credit: Yolk Farm

three large Kune Kune pigs in a sty

Pop over to the farm shop to pick up a bag of unsellable veg to feed to the 'waste warriors' during your visit - Credit: Nicky Rogerson

sign post showing where to go for the animals, farm shop and restaurant

There's lots of explore at Yolk farm - Credit: Nicky Rogerson

hands hold a bunch of eggs

Pick up the freshest of eggs laid on the farm that day from Minskip Farm Shop - Credit: Nicky Rogerson

a sign with an egg secret on it

There's lots of fun facts to discover as you explore the farm - Credit: Nicky Rogerson

Ben and Emma sit at a table in Yolk kitchen

Ben and Emma Mosey were inspired by the laid back brunch culture of Australia which inspired them to open Yolk Kitchen - Credit: Nicky Rogerson

wooden crates coloured and used as lamp shades

Yolk Kitchen is full of unique touches inspired by life on an egg farm - Credit: Nicky Rogerson

seats made from swings and colander lamp shades

Sip your coffee on a swing - Credit: Nicky Rogerson

frangipane muffin with a latte

Stop by Yolk Kitchen for a warming cup of coffee and a fresh bake - Credit: Nicky Rogerson

man touches noses with an alpaca

Get the chance to rub noses with the alpacas when you book an alpaca experience - Credit: Nicky Rogerson

alpaca stands with straw in its mouth

Spend some time with the farm's friendly alpacas - Credit: Nicky Rogerson

diagram detailing life of an egg

Learn all about eggs at Yolk farm - Credit: Nicky Rogerson

Ben and Emma sit on a hay bale holding hands

Ben and Emma are on a mission to bridge the gap in knowledge between farming and food - Credit: Nicky Rogerson