5 of the best gardens at the 2019 RHS Flower Show Tatton Park

The Phytosanctuary Garden. Designed by Kristian Reay. Sponsored by London Stone, Macgregor Smith, Pr

The Phytosanctuary Garden. Designed by Kristian Reay. Sponsored by London Stone, Macgregor Smith, Practicality Brown, Woodscape, Stephen Myburgh, Deepdale Trees, CED Stone and Greentech. Young Designer Garden. RHS Flower Show Tatton Park 2019. Stand no. 362 - Credit: Archant

This year’s RHS Flower Show Tatton Park gave us garden inspiration in spades - so we asked the creators of some of our favourite spaces to share the techniques behind their designs

The Phytosanctuary Garden. Designed by Kristian Reay. Sponsored by London Stone, Macgregor Smith, Pr

The Phytosanctuary Garden. Designed by Kristian Reay. Sponsored by London Stone, Macgregor Smith, Practicality Brown, Woodscape, Stephen Myburgh, Deepdale Trees, CED Stone and Greentech. Young Designer Garden. RHS Flower Show Tatton Park 2019. Stand no. 362 - Credit: NOT Archant

The Phytosanctuary Garden

By Kristian Raey, Young Garden Designer of the Year

People tend to relax more if they feel enclosed in a space and I've used various techniques to achieve that in this garden. The feature wall, as well as the hedges and the trees planted in the corners, give a lovely vertical element; you can do something similar with a trellis if a wall doesn't work for you. There's also plenty of height in the borders. There are no straight lines; all the borders are undulating and planted loosely for a romantic, Mediterranean feel so it's like they're hugging you as you walk through. I've used softer blues and whites at the front of the borders and more vibrant yellows at the back to draw your eye through the garden.

BBC North West Tonight presenter, Roger Johnson with Jackie Bramble of the Dianne Oxberry Trust, and

BBC North West Tonight presenter, Roger Johnson with Jackie Bramble of the Dianne Oxberry Trust, and Dianne's husband, Ian Hindle, admiring the Sunshine Garden - in memory of the late BBC NWT much loved presenter Dianne Oxberry - Credit: Pics; John Cocks

The BBC North West Tonight Sunshine Garden

by Lee 'Garden Ninja' Burkhill

People can get obsessed with symmetry in smaller gardens but that's often a mistake. This works nicely because I've used an asymmetric design which gives me more space and generous proportions. Instead of two slimmer borders I've used one large one and ran the path down one side of the garden, which gives room for a bigger arbour than you'd think would work in this space. Another benefit of a big border - it hides a multitude of sins; weeds are less noticeable! Always think about how best to make the most of the space you have; here even the fence has climbers coming down it.

A Silver Gilt Medal went to this Contemplation Corner created by designer Pip Probert

A Silver Gilt Medal went to this Contemplation Corner created by designer Pip Probert - Credit: Pics; John Cocks

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Contemplation Corner

by Pip Probert, Outerspaces

I love colour and I love to create features that don't cost the earth. Here we used a mixture of slatted trellis panels as well as new and old scaffold boards and gave them a light wash with a Cuprinol Shades product in a coral colour. It added a warmth to the garden and connected to the planting colour-scheme, which used clashing oranges and pale pinks linked by deeper shades of the same colours - with the odd pop of purple to stand out from the rest. They may clash side by side but in the bigger picture they work beautifully.

Baroque Garden - Young designer, Laurence Senior with friend, Lucy Webster

Baroque Garden - Young designer, Laurence Senior with friend, Lucy Webster - Credit: Pics; John Cocks

Baroque Garden

by Laurence Senior

I specialise in Baroque and Tudor style gardens that have grandeur and a restrained elegance. To create unity across the garden I've used various shades of terracotta, from the handmade bricks to the large, regal urns. To create a historic look I pointed the bricks with lime mortar. The lilypond is a stunning centre piece and the design around it is very formal - but then it's all softened by the planting that's wild and diaphanous with delicate white flowers. Together it becomes a secluded, idyllic setting.

Liam English, the head gardener for The Port Sunlight Village Trust won a Silver Gilt Medal for his

Liam English, the head gardener for The Port Sunlight Village Trust won a Silver Gilt Medal for his The Art and Nature of a Port Sunlight Garden.... inspired by the gardens of the historic Port Sunlight Village on the Wirral - Credit: Pics; John Cocks

The Art and Nature of Port Sunlight

By Liam English, Best Back to Back Garden winner

We made the most of the space by creating banks of soil in the centre of the borders that sat around 45cms above the level of the grass. This allowed us to create height without having to use very tall plants and it also increased the surface area of the soil so we could simply fit more in. It's a great technique to use in smaller gardens. It also means that the soil will drain a little easier, increasing the range of plants you can pop in there. For the backdrop we used a Portuguese Laurel hedge which has glossy leaves and reflects light back into the space.

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