12 historic village churches in Cheshire

St James's Church, Gawsworth
Photo: James Balme

St James's Church, Gawsworth Photo: James Balme - Credit: Archant

We take a look at some of the most most historically significant village churches in Cheshire.

St Chad's Church, Wybunbury

St Chad's Church, Wybunbury - Credit: Archant

St Chad's Church in Wybunbury
The tower is known locally as the ‘Leaning Tower of Cheshire’ and for good reason for since at least the 1400’s churches built on this site have continually slowly but surely sunk forcing five former churches to be demolished.
Click here to read more about St Chad's and view the video tour

St Michaels Church, Marbury

St Michaels Church, Marbury - Credit: James Balme/Tvpresenter4history

St Michael's Church in Marbury
On the Cheshire/Shropshire border stands the church of St Michael & all Angels built in the 15th century. A timber, wattle and daub church was present on the site in 1299 according to archaic documents. The current church that still stands today dates from the 15th century, the first incumbent being registered in 1530.
Click here to read more about St Michael's and view the video tour

St Chads in Farndon (c) James Balme, Tvpresenter4history

St Chads in Farndon (c) James Balme, Tvpresenter4history - Credit: Archant

St Chads in Farndon
The church of St Chads in Farndon stands on a sandstone outcrop close to the river Dee on the English\Welsh border. This is no ordinary church and a place of worship is believed to have stood here since Celtic times. 
Click here to read more about St Chads and view the video tour

Medieval St Werburgh's Church in the Cheshire village of Warburton
Photo: James Balme

Medieval St Werburgh's Church in the Cheshire village of Warburton Photo: James Balme - Credit: Archant

St Werburgh's Church in Warburton
On a steep embankment shaded by old yew trees in the quiet backwater of Warburton village stands St Werburgh’s which was once home to an order of Norbertine canons, which established a priory here around 1187 AD.
Click here to read more about St Werburgh's and view the video tour

The Norman chapel, Prestbury
Photo: James Balme

The Norman chapel, Prestbury Photo: James Balme - Credit: Archant

St Peter’s Church in Prestbury
The Norman chapel at St Peter’s Church in Prestbury served as a place of worship until after the Magna Carta and the deaths of King John and Pope Innocent III in 1216.
Click here to read more about St Peter's and view the video tour

St Mary’s Church in Rostherne (c) James Balme, Tvpresenter4history

St Mary’s Church in Rostherne (c) James Balme, Tvpresenter4history - Credit: Archant

St Mary’s Church in Rostherne
High on a hill high above Rostherne Mere in Cheshire stands the archaic site of St Mary’s Church. The site is mentioned in a deed dated 1188 AD, the church that stands today has been added to frequently over time.
Click here to read more about St Mary's and view the video tour
 

The church of St Oswald - Lower Peover.

The church of St Oswald - Lower Peover. - Credit: Archant

St Oswald’s in Lower Peover
In the village of Lower Peover, close to the picture postcard cottages stands the archaic church of St Oswald standing on a site that has had a church on it since at least 1269. The west tower dates right back to 1582 and stands proud high above the village.
Click here to read more about St Oswald's and view the video tour
 

The tomb of Sir Francis Fitton, circa 1608, in the Church of St James, Gawsworth
Photo: James Balm

The tomb of Sir Francis Fitton, circa 1608, in the Church of St James, Gawsworth Photo: James Balme - Credit: Archant

St James the Great in Gawsworth 
Visitors to the village of Gawsworth will see a beautifully landscaped lake dominated by the parish church of St James the Great, which stands on high ground looking down on the gardens of the medieval manor of Gawsworth Hall.
Click here to read more about St James and view the video tour

Jane Johnson, the young wife of the dancing master of Nantwich, whose statuesque figure so offended

Jane Johnson, the young wife of the dancing master of Nantwich, whose statuesque figure so offended the vicar of Bunbury he buried her effigy in the church grounds - Credit: James Balme

St Boniface in Bunbury
There is little known about the history of Bunbury prior to the Norman conquest but it’s believed the name is derived from Saxon times. The church of St Boniface that stands in the village is thought to be the site of a much earlier Christian place of worship where a timber structure stood around the year 755 AD.
Click here to read more about St Boniface and view the video tour

The Venables canopied tomb at St Mary's Church, Astbury

The Venables canopied tomb at St Mary's Church, Astbury - Credit: James Balme

St Mary in Astbury
The Church of St Mary stands proudly overlooking the pretty village with the earliest parts of its construction dating to the 12th century. The tower we see today was built between the 14th and 15th centuries. 
Click here to read more about St Mary and view the video tour

St Oswald's at the heart of the village of Lower Peover, Cheshire

St Oswald's at the heart of the village of Lower Peover - Credit: James Balme

St Oswald in Lower Peover
The church of St Oswald with its impressive tower, dating to around 1500, stands side by side with the old Warren de Tabley Arms hotel, known today as the Bells of Peover. The name of the inn has nothing to do with the church or its famous bells but derives from the Bell family who owned the establishment from the late 19th century. 
Click here to read more about St Oswald and view the video tour

All Saints Church in Siddington 

All Saints Church in Siddington is a standout feature on the A34 between Congleton and Alderley Edge - Credit: James Balme

All Saint’s in Siddington
Deep in the heart of Cheshire, surrounded by some of the county’s finest dairyland stands the ancient timber-framed church of All Saint’s in Siddington, close to Capesthorne Hall and Redesmere lake. The chapel was used as a chapel of ease to nearby Prestbury and consecrated in 1521, meaning that this year it celebrates its 500th anniversary.
Click here to read more about All Saint’s and view the video tour

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