Surrey teenager wins international young wildlife photographer of the year

Today the shots that will take centre stage in the Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition were announced - and two young Surrey photographers were among those rewarded for their efforts.

Today the shots that will take centre stage in the Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition were announced - and two young Surrey photographers were among those rewarded for their efforts.

The world-renowned show debuts at the Natural History Museum on Friday October 19, featuring 100 awe-inspiring images with British photographers snaring twenty of the coveted places.

Guildford’s Eve Tucker won young wildlife photographer of the year (15-17 years) for her City Gull image and Carshalton Beeches’ Joshua Burch was specially commended in the young wildlife photographer of the year (11-14 years) category for his Blood Donation shot.

City Gull by Guildford’s Eve Tucker, who won young wildlife photographer of the year (15-17 years)Some of the tallest buildings in London surround the docklands at the heart of the business and financial district of Canary Wharf. As Eve walked along the wharf, a bird caught her eye. It was a black-headed gull, of which there are many in the city. But this one was resting on a very remarkable area of water. Eve realised that she was looking at reflections of the straight lines of the nearby office block, distorted into moving swirls. “The effect was so unusual – it gave a beautiful setting for an urban wildlife image,” she says. Like all true photographers, Eve had noticed what others most often fail to see, even when it’s right in front of them. 

Blood Donation by Carshalton Beeches’ Joshua Burch, who was specially commended in young wildlife photographer of the year (11-14 years)The dragonflies weren’t cooperating. Joshua had borrowed his dad’s macro lens and sat down by the pond in his garden in Surrey to photograph them, but they just weren’t staying still for long enough. Then a very willing subject appeared. This one offered to sit very still indeed – but for a price. “I took about 10 pictures of the mosquito, starting with the ‘empty’ stage and ending when it had a full tank,” says Joshua, who had to take the shot one-handed. “It’s a female – they need blood to develop their eggs (males don’t bite). My dad thought I was mad. But I told him that it was all part of the dedication of being a nature photographer, as he so often reminds me. One of the things I really like about photography is that you look at things differently and notice much more around you.”

Veolia Environnement Wildlife Photographer of the Year at the Natural History Museum, London from Friday October 19 to Sunday March 3. Admission: adult �10; child and concession �5, family (up to two adults and three children) �27. More @ www.nhm.ac.uk/wildphoto.

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