7 Cornwall pub walks

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Cornwall boasts some of the most beautiful countryside in the UK, from breathtaking coastlines, secluded woodland and rolling greenery. Whether a pint of real ale, a glass of wine or a slap-up meal is what you’re after, we have found you 7 places to stop off and enjoy a much-deserved pit-stop during a walk through some of Cornwall’s prettiest areas.

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1. The Camelford Way

Embrace the beautiful scenery as you walk through the beautiful fields of Camelford, with wild garlic dotted everywhere on the route. Over the iron kissing gate, horses and cattle can be spotted but it is advised that you don’t take your four-legged friends with you as they may disrupt the livestock. Either at the start or at the end of your walk you can retreat to one of Camelford’s treasured pubs. Visit The Mason’s Arms, an 18th century building opposite the library, serving a range of delicious home cooked meals or The Darlington, an 800 year old coaching Inn in the located in the market square, offering patrons a friendly welcome and an extensive pub menu.

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2. Gurnard’s Head to Zennor Head

Before heading off on a peaceful stroll from Gurnards Head, head to Gurnard’s Head pub where can enjoy a fine selection of wines and ales while soaking in the sea air from Cornwall’s surrounding stunning coastline.

On the retreat from the pub, the walk will quickly reveal a narrow path to Treen Cove, a picturesque beach rich with history that is tucked away just off of Gurnard Head.  Later on the remains of Treen chapel can be found. Originally Treen chapel had 7ft high walls; however the chapel was cut into a hollow in the cliff back in the 19th century and now the remaining ruins can be explored.

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3. Perranuthnoe to Prussia Cove

Before embarking on the route to Perranuthnoe to Prussia Cove, why not try The Victoria Inn, Perranuthnoe? The award-winning 12th century inn, renowned for being one of the oldest inns of Cornwall, is the perfect spot to visit before walking the Cornish countryside. Enjoy one of the many local ciders or ales on offer or share a decadent sharing platter with lots of local delicacies.

At the beginning of the walk Trevean Cove can be found. This cove used to be used to haul small fishing boats up the shore; soak in the history at the beach before carrying on with your stroll. Cross over the bridge which occupies the stream for spectacular views of Stackhouse Cove. The cove itself has lots to do; with lots of rock pools to discover new creatures and snorkelling or swimming in the sea in warmer weather. At the end of the walk settle down in the secluded Prussia Cove, made up of four smaller coves: Piskies Cove, Bessy’s Cove, King’s Cove and Coule’s Cove, ideal for a peaceful pit-stop before making the journey back.

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4. Kennack Sands to Kuggar

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Grab a quick drink at the cosy Potters Bar, Kennack Sands before the walk to the picture-perfect Conrish hamlet of Kuggar. This walk isn’t as heavy as some of the others and is tailored more to those of you who aren’t big hikers. Although a shorter stroll at 1.6 miles long; it consists of a beach, footpaths and quiet country lanes making for a tranquil and relaxing walk. While walking the Kennack Sands you will find some beautiful decorations on the beach, such as the serpentine rock, these can come in red, black, green, yellow or even white! Kennack Sands is part of the Lizard National Nature Reserve and is the largest in lowland Britain; home to the rare, brightly coloured sea anemones which can be spotted swaying in the sea beds.

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5. Blisland to Lavethan Wood

Positioned at the beginning of this woodland walk is the Blisland Inn, the CAMRA National Pub of the Year, known for their range of real ales. Get your energy up for the walk ahead with one of the Inn’s hearty chicken and ham pies or a bowl of warming vegetable soup. This particular walk is a circular route so you can end at the pub too as well as starting there! The Woodland Trust managed Lavethan Wood, is truly a spectacle to see and it’s not difficult to see why it’s been named an area of outstanding natural beauty. Soak in the beautiful scenery as you walk through paths surrounded by gorgeous patches of blooming flora and fauna. Nearby the Blisland Inn is Lavethan Manor, a stunning 16th century manor house rich in history which offers accommodation in the tranquillity of the Cornish countryside.

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6. Polkerris to Fowey

Start this 4.5 mile walk at The Rashleigh Inn, Polkerris, which is situated on the beach and offers picturesque views all year long. The Inn boasts an extensive menu leaving patrons spoilt for choice; enjoy freshly caught seafood, local ales and cider, classic pub grub and roast dinners on a Sunday sat beside the sea.

This walk is a little longer than the others described in the article, however this is made up for with the beautiful views that you will encounter such as the Gribbin Daymark, the eye-catching National Trust owned building banded in red and white stripes. Climb the 109 steps up for amazing views over St Austells Bay. Take the slope towards Polridmouth Cove; when you get down to sea level, you will be standing on the beautiful grounds that were used in Daphne du Maurier’s novel, Rebecca.

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7. Coastal St Ives

Begin this walk following the harbour until you reach Smeaton pier, where you will find The Sloop Inn, one of Cornwall’s oldest Inn, starting life in 1312. With beautiful views spanning the Cornish coastline, this is an ideal pit stop to soak in the scenery and enjoy a range of delicious Cornish ales. While admiring the stunning seaside town of St Ives, try to visit the St Ives Museum, a treasure trove of the town’s history, which originally housed a pilchard curing cellar, which would’ve been used when St Ives was the most important fishing port on the North Coast of Cornwall. On the coast is the Queen’s Hotel, a gastro pub in the town serving an array of flavoursome food full of local produce in a relaxed setting perfect for a retreat after your stroll.

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