6 of the best January walks in Lancashire

Frosty Chatburn

Frosty Chatburn - Credit: John Lenehan

Bring in the new year and burn off those pounds gained over the festive season with this selection of walks from our archives.

An intrepid walker at the second Wards Stone trig point

An intrepid walker at the second Wards Stone trig point - Credit: John Lenehan

Ward’s Stone
January 2021 issue
A circular walk from Tarnbrook that encompasses the summit of Ward’s Stone, the highest hill in the Forest of Bowland.
Click here to view the details of the Ward's Stone walk

BOwland Fells from Spire Hill

BOwland Fells from Spire Hill - Credit: John Lenehan

Hurst Green and Longridge Fell
January 2020 issue
Most walkers tackle Longridge Fell from with a long gradual climb from Longridge or shorter but very steep climbs from Chipping or the Hodder Valley, this route from Hurst Green, is not overly long and not overly steep but has plenty of magnificent views.
Click here to view the details of the  Longridge Fell walk

Hoghton Tower Hill

Hoghton Tower Hill - Credit: John Lenehan

Witton Park and Billinge Hill
January 2019 issue
Many families will flock to Witton Park during the weekends, you can set off from here to explore the heights of Billinge Hill.
Click here to view the details of the  Billinge Hill walk

Grindleton is mentioned in the Domesday Book

Grindleton is mentioned in the Domesday Book - Credit: Archant

Chatburn and Grindleton
January 2018 issue
This easy walk around the Ribble Valley sets off from the easily accessible Chatburn, just off the A59.
Click here to view the details of the Grindleton walk

Edisford Bridge

Edisford Bridge - Credit: John Lenehan

Hodder Valley
January 2017 issue
Set off from the outskirts of Clitheroe and enjoy this circular walk that takes in sections of the Hodder and Ribble rivers.
Click here to view the details of the Hodder Valley walk

Whalley from the Nab

Whalley from the Nab - Credit: John Lenehan

Whalley
January 2016 issue
Pass by some the Ribble Valley's most famous landmarks, both man-made and natural in this walk that takes you by the Nick of Pendle and the Whalley Viaduct.
Click here to view the details of the Whalley walk

All the routes were correct at the time of publication, over time access to certain parts of the walk may be subject to change. We recommend you refer to an up to date OS map before you set off to plot your route.