Where to see the prettiest lavender and heather in Surrey

Mayfield lavender

Enjoy lavender cream teas and cider at Mayfield Lavender - Credit: Flickr/Peter Trimming

It’s summertime, and that means the luscious lavender farms and heathlands in Surrey are in full bloom. See them for yourselves and bask in the purple prettiness at these fabulous locations…

Lavender

Mayfield Lavender

Bees love lavender because of its attractive colour and scent - Credit: Flickr/Sally Butcher


Mayfield Lavender Fields
Mayfield Lavender Fields is a masterpiece by Brendan Maye, who originally created the field to add life to lavender brand Yardley. It was originally a Victorian lavender field, but Brendan replanted fresh seeds and varieties to create the gorgeous rolling fields you see today. The peak times for the fields blooming are July and August, where visitors can wander through the organic flowers. Afterwards, enjoy lunch at the al fresco café, where you can order a lavender cream tea and even sip on lavender cider.
£4 per person, free for children 16 and under
mayfieldlavender.com

Oak Tree Farm
One of the youngest lavender fields in the UK, this farm is known as ‘Surrey’s secret lavender field’ as it has only been open since 2020. It is a pick your own lavender farm, so all you need to do is have a carefree wander then take sprigs home to decorate with, or even make your own soaps ointments. For the kids there is a butterfly field, as well as 1.3km Joe’s Foam Bath Lavender Trail where you can get your own foam at the end. Sit atop of a haybale and take in the beauty of the fields while relaxing with families and friends.
Free entry, £4 for Joe’s Foam Bath Lavender Trail
naturallthinking.com

READ MORE: Wet and wild days out in Surrey

Carshalton Lavender
For a different approach to lavender picking, Carshalton are a fine place to lend a hand to. It is entirely volunteer led, and are always looking for people to help foster cuttings, help out at stalls, help at the pick your own harvests, and tying lavender. The annual harvest takes place on July 24 and 25, where you can pluck handsome bunches of lavender, before heading to the stalls and picking up essential oils, floral water, lavender crafts and plants.
Volunteering free, pick your own harvest £5 for adults and free for children
carshaltonlavender.org

Heathlands

Heathlands Surrey

Spot grazing cows, dragonflies and rare birds in the Surrey heathlands - Credit: Jon Hawkins Surrey Hills Photography


Brentmoor Health & Folly Bog
Plenty of remarkable rare species occupy this stunning heathland. Keep your eyes out for rare tiger beetles and red deer nestled among the flowers and shrubbery. The dry heath has lots of ling heather, which is a delicate light pink colour. The wet areas of the heath have lots of insects to discover, and has cotton-grass and white beak sedge too. This is particularly a popular spot among lizards, snakes and slow worms, so make sure to wear clothing that will protect you from any surprise ankle tickling!
Open at all times, best visited June-September
surreywildlifetrust.org/nature-reserves/brentmoor-heath-folly-bog

Wisley & Ockham Commons & Chatley Heath
With its grand pine and birch trees and luscious rows of heather, this heathland habitat looks like it could easily have come out of a fairy tale. There’s easy access to it through the M25, and facilities including parking, refreshments and even a picnic area so you can relax among the beautiful surroundings. Spot beautiful and unusual wildlife including the hobby and the southern warbler.  During your visit be sure to take a look at the Semaphore Tower, which was a key part of a message carrying chain between naval figures.
Open at all times, best visited June-September
surreywildlifetrust.org/nature-reserves/wisley-ockham-commons-chatley-heath

SUBSCRIBE: To Surrey Life for the best places to go in the county

Whitmoor & Rickford Commons
This location just outside of Guildford is a haven for dragonflies, with pools originally meant for grazing cattle attracting 19 recorded different types of species, including the magnificent emperor dragonfly. It is also home to three different types of heather: ling, cross-leaved and bell. And if you miss the heather, don’t fret - the fields are beautiful in spring for their yellow celandines and in autumn for ripe hazelnuts and acorns.
Open at all times, best visited May-September
surreywildlifetrust.org/nature-reserves/whitmoor-rickford-commons