Off-the-beaten-track beaches in Yorkshire

HWBP48 Path leading down to Hunmanby sands on a beautiful morning. Filey Bay, North Yorkshire, Engla

Path leading down to Hunmanby sands on a beautiful morning. - Credit: Andrew Kearton / Alamy Stock Photo

We know the big players when it comes to buckets and spades in Yorkshire but check out these sandy spots for some rock-pooling, pebble-gathering and quieter beach walks. 


Fraisthorpe Beach, East Riding of Yorkshire, England, UK

Fraisthorpe Beach, - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Fraisthorpe Beach  
Two miles south of Bridlington, this flat beach is popular with dog walkers and has plenty of space to walk for miles in either direction. It’s also popular with windsurfers as there is more surf than the beach at Bridlington. Great too for horse riding, kite flying and general beach hanging out. Easy access too.  
 

North sea coast with stones and cliffs of Danes Dyke near Bridlington, East Riding of Yorkshire, UK

North sea coast with stones and cliffs of Danes Dyke - Credit: Bernd Brueggemann/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Danes Dyke, Flamborough 
A pebbling paradise! On the southern side of the Flamborough headland, just under a mile west of landmark South Landing. The pebble beach, which is flanked by rocks and backed by cliffs, becomes sandier closer to the water. At low tide, a number of rockpools are exposed, making this a good place to hunt for marine wildlife.  
From the beach there are views across Bridlington Bay and further down the coast.  
 

Cayton Bay

Cayton Bay - Credit: Danton Vorster

Cayton Bay  
Cayton Bay has a magnificent wide sweeping bay, a year-round dog-friendly beach, clean water, affordable parking and great facilities. A beautiful place to explore, no matter what time of the year you decide to visit. A fan favourite with surfers, bird watchers, fun-seekers and fossil hunters, or those who just want to relax and unwind. Cayton Bay nestles between the famous resorts of Scarborough and Filey, as an area of unspoilt natural beauty.   
 

Port Mulgrave

Port Mulgrave - Credit: Kevin Gibson Photography

Port Mulgrave beach 
Play the pirate and have an adventure discovering this often-unexplored beach next to its famous neighbour, Staithes. This little sand and rock beach was once a thriving port but is now a derelict harbour where ironstone from local pits was once shipped up to Jarrow on the Tyne for processing. There are still plenty of reminders of the beach's history, including the mouth of a large tunnel which runs deep into the cliff.  
 

Hornsea sunset

Sunset at Hornsea - Credit: David Land


Hornsea  
Hornsea South is a sand and shingle beach next to the small seaside resort of Hornsea. It is a popular beach for many different water sports and also for walkers with the Transpennine Trail finishing here. The beach is lined with wooden groynes to prevent erosion. In Victorian times it became a popular seaside retreat with a promenade running alongside the beach. Beyond the town is Hornsea Mere, one of the largest lakes in Yorkshire. 

SUBSCRIBE: To Yorkshire Life magazine's print or digital editions to discover everything that's wonderful about living in the county 

You can walk along the sands to Whitby from Raithwaite

You can walk along the sands to Whitby from Raithwaite - Credit: David Muscroft/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Sandsend  
Not so much a secret but definitely a pocket of peace compared to nearby Whitby. Good sandy beaches, plenty of paddling potential and a cracking walk on the cliffs to the spooky outcrop that looks more like a moonscape – created by the  alum industry   from the mines and the spoils. There are great views from here as you walk to Kettleness point.  
 

HWBP48 Path leading down to Hunmanby sands on a beautiful morning. Filey Bay, North Yorkshire, Engla

Path leading down to Hunmanby sands on a beautiful morning. - Credit: Andrew Kearton / Alamy Stock Photo

Hunmanby Gap 
A gap in the hillside takes you down to the beach midway between Filey and Bempton. Get to it easily by driving down Sands Lane and parking in a car park/field.  The beach is huge and usually pretty  empty and it’s good for barbecues and dogs.  There are no annoying rules so you can take your dog, have a barbecue etc. The walk in to Filey and back takes around an hour and a half and you will pass Billy Butlin’s holiday home, a striking 1930’s art deco house known as the White House (no dodgy chalets for Billy). Apparently Charlie the Butlins’ elephant is buried nearby. You can also walk the other way towards Bempton and Flamborough via beach and cliff paths. Or if you want to take a walk inland, you can take the Centenary Way.
 

Skinningrove Village, Cleveland, Norrth Yorkshire. Former ironstone mining village,

Skinningrove Village - Credit: Mike Kipling Photography / Alamy Stock Photo

Skinningrove/Cattersty Sands  
Cattersty Sands is a long, sand and shingle beach between Saltburn and Staithes with The Cleveland Way walking route passing adjacent to the beach. The beach is intersected by a rocky pier which dates back to the areas mining days with an old jetty built in 1886, for loading steamboats which transported the ore to Middlesbrough. Cattersty Sands is a good destination for those seeking a bit of tranquillity.  In summer good for safe bathing and sandcastle-making.  
 

Marske by the Sea

Marske by the Sea - Credit: Peter Robinson

Markse-by-the-sea 
Between Redcar and often-busy Saltburn, this is a quiet stretch of coastline with opposite the old harbour village of Marske-by-the-Sea. Water sports such as surfing, boating, and windsurfing are all popular along this stretch of coastline, as is fishing, swimming and walking. The wide beach is great for walks and sunsets, particularly when the tide is out and a vast, flat, sandy area is exposed.  


READ MORE: Robin Hood's Bay, Staithes  and Runswick Bay


Send your photos of the Yorkshire coast to us at photos@yorkshirelife.co.uk