6 great walks near Slaidburn

The view of Slaidburn from the banks of the Hodder

The view of Slaidburn from the banks of the Hodder - Credit: John Lenehan

Historically part of Yorkshire, Slaidburn lies near the head of the River Hodder and Stocks Reservoir, both within the Forest of Bowland. The road links make it a perfect base for a short walking break.

Witches Way Marker Stone

Witches Way Marker Stone - Credit: John Lenehan

Whitendale Valley and Dunsop Fell
0 miles from Slaidburn
Follow in the footsteps the Romans on Watling Street that once ran from Manchester to Carlisle. It was along this road the Lancashire Witches were taken from Clitheroe to Lancaster to their infamous trials.
Click here to view the details of the Dunsop Fell walk

Trough of Bowland

Trough of Bowland - Credit: John Lenehan

Trough of Bowland and Brennand Valley
4 miles from Slaidburn
Setting off from the popular Lancashire village of Dunsop Bridge, you head north towards the stunning Trough of Bowland.
Click here to view the details of the Trough of Bowland walk

Puddleducks Cafe in Dunsop Bridge

Puddleducks Cafe in Dunsop Bridge - Credit: John Lenehan

Dunsop Bridge and Newton Round
4 miles from Slaidburn
Another walk from the location that was once regarded as the centre of the UK, this time you east towards the county border.
Click here to view the details of the Dunsop Bridge walk

Stocks Reservoir

Stocks Reservoir - Credit: John Lenehan

Stocks Reservoir circular
5 miles from Slaidburn
A glorious walk around Stocks Reservoir and a brief encounter with the River Hodder make this arguably, one of the finest waterside walks in the county.
Click here to view the details of the Stocks Reservoir walk

The Three Yorkshire Peaks on the horizon

The Three Yorkshire Peaks on the horizon - Credit: John Lenehan

Cross of Greet
6 miles from Slaidburn
The remote road from Slaidburn to Bentham through the Bowland Fells has got to be one of the most beautiful scenic routes between Lancashire and Yorkshire.
Click here to view the details of the Cross of Greet walk

The grand entrance to Gisburn Park

The grand entrance to Gisburn Park - Credit: John Lenehan

Gisburn and Paythorne
9 miles from Slaidburn
Gisburn was actually named Gisburne until the railway arrived and the modern name was adopted. Then, the boundary changes in 1974 led to it becoming part of Lancashire.
Click here to view the details of the Gisburn walk

Hark to Bounty Inn, Slaidburn

Hark to Bounty Inn, Slaidburn - Credit: Kirsty Thompson

If you are venturing into Slaidburn, the village pub is well worth a visit. 
The Hark to Bounty, is a 16th-century coaching inn and is thought to have been named after a particularly noisy dog. What makes this ancient pub so rare is that upstairs is an old courtroom, which operated until the 1930s.
 

All the routes were correct at the time of publication, over time access to certain parts of the walk may be subject to change. We advise you acquire a recent OS map of the area you plan to visit and confirm there are no major changes.