A video tour exploring the history of St Mary in Rostherne

The Church of St Mary at Rostherne, Cheshire

The Church of St Mary at Rostherne with its second tower - Credit: Veronica Fallows

Our history man unearths fascinating stories of past times and tragedies on his visit to Rostherne

The Church of St Mary at Rostherne, Cheshire

The Church of St Mary at Rostherne with its second tower - Credit: Veronica Fallows

Three miles to the north of Tatton Park lies the picturesque village of Rostherne well known by many for its magnificent mere and nature reserve.

Mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086, Rostherne was held by Gilbert De Venables who came to England at the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066. Gilbert was given large tracts of land by William the Conqueror, mostly in Cheshire, which he held under the Earldom of Cheshire.

Join our history man James Balme as he pays a visit to the ancient St Mary's church in Rostherne to tell the story of the collapse of the church steeple and bell tower way back in the year 1741 and how for many years beforehand warnings had been given but ignored that the fateful day would arrive when the steeple would come crashing to the ground.

James also takes a brief look at some of the treasures that still remain both inside and outside the church of St Mary in Rostherne including a stone carving of a Celtic god recovered from the waters of nearby Rostherne mere.

Things to look out for 
Stone carving of Celtic god Cernunnos in the churchyard 
Stone effigy of Sir Hugh Venables (d.1260 AD) 
Carved marble memorial to Charlotte Lucy Beatrix Egerton                 
Rare church entrance lychgate, circa 1640 

For more videos exploring the history of Cheshire go the TVPresenter4History Youtube channel

Or you can keep up to date with James’ latest travel at facebook.com/historymancheshirelife 

READ MORE: Beautiful photographs of Rostherne

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